• Insipid Board

Interview with Jade

Interviewer: Paakhi Maheshwari

Interviewee: Jade


Paakhi:

Could you explain to us your gender and your sexuality?


Jade:

I am non-binary, which means I'm neither a boy nor a girl. I am also bisexual.


Paakhi:

Could you elaborate on being non-binary for our readers?


Jade:

So when I say I'm non-binary, that is more of how I express myself and how I identify and not really with how I was born.


Paakhi:

Okay, so, have you come out to society with your sexual identification?


Jade:

All my friends do know about my identity. However, unfortunately, parents are not as accepting. I have worked with them before, to try to use my correct name. They refused to use my correct pronouns. But my friends and my teachers use it correctly.


Paakhi:

When you decided to come out to your school, was there anyone that you could open up to freely or confide in? Was there one person that you were sure would accept and respect your identity?


Jade:

My teachers and my course class were definitely a safe space.


Paakhi;

Did you ever worry about people's reactions to something that pertains to your identity?


Jade:

I've had some older teachers, like the Algebra teacher in my sophomore year of high school. I was a bit worried about what he would think. I actually didn't come out to him because he seemed a bit more old-fashioned.


Paakhi:

When you are in a society where people might be accepting it in the end, it comes down to what you are comfortable with and how you want people to respect or address you as.

As a society, we are moving towards being more accepting of people. So what has your experience been with that?


Jade:

With people in my own generation, it's sort of been a 50-50 in a way. Some people in my generation are really, really accepting. However, there have been a few that think that my liking girls are not liking guys as a biological female is weird. I've heard a lot of slurs being thrown at people.


Paakhi:

Okay, so as you said, there have been experiences that weren't necessarily comfortable or even accepting of the people. Are you comfortable sharing any of those experiences?


Jade:

I'm lucky I haven't had too many experiences. However, in my freshman English class where this kid commented asking if the girl leaning on my shoulder one morning on the bus was my girlfriend. At the time, she was. But I said no, she was just a friend. He nodded and then turned to his friend and whispered "must be," the F slur, "faggot".


Paakhi:

How should an ally or a person from the community react when something like this happens?


Jade:

I've heard many slurs being thrown about at my school by people of my generation. I think if you are if you're a teacher or maybe even a parent if you hear that, please say something, tell them to not use those words. Tell them the historical meaning behind it.


Paakhi:

So, how do you tell someone, or how would you advise someone not of the community to address someone who might be of the community?


Jade:

In the case of if they're using somebody's incorrect pronouns, personally, I would use a gender-neutral pronoun, until I can ask that person, and when you go to ask somebody just say, hey, what are your preferred pronouns?


Paakhi:

So, is there anything you do for pride month?


Jade:

I do actually have a pride flag in my room. The studio I work for the server for has partnered with a pride flag project where they give out free Pride Flags. I've gotten one this year. My parents don't seem to care about that. I think they know I like girls because I have a girlfriend now and I have been out about that. I don't really go to any of the private events because I don't think my parents would let me go.


Paakhi:

Knowing that you are proud to be yourself is one small, but crucial step towards celebrating pride month.